Tag Archives: Biopesticides

Insecticidas naturales contra la mosca blanca en tomate. El poder de Nakar.

Natural insecticides against whiteflies on Tomato Plants

Whitefly pests are causing serious problems in the Spanish tomato crops, especially due to the transmission of viruses such as Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV). Hence the importance of combating this problem through an integrated management that includes effective natural insecticides against whitefly on tomato plants.

In order to keep the whitefly population at bay, integrated pest management is the best method of action. Its objective is the rational and efficient control of pests and diseases, minimizing the amount of residues in the products to be harvested. It is necessary combine cultural measures, biological control and phytosanitary treatments, with priority of natural ones versus chemicals.

Farmers do not find it easy to find specialized, effective natural formulations that do not leave residues in the crop, but they exist.

The best natural insecticides against whiteflies on tomato plants

Natural insecticides against whiteflies on Tomato Plants

Among all the natural insecticides against whiteflies on tomato plants, Nakar product stands out given the good results it has demonstrated in trials and in commercial application, and given its high specialization. It is a bioinsecticide that presents excellent contact control of soft shell insects in all stages of development and especially of the whitefly in tomato.

Its state-of-the-art formulation gives it the ability to penetrate and fragment the lipoprotein matrix of insect cell membranes. The disruption of the membrane causes the evacuation of the cellular contents causing the dehydration and death of the insects.

Given its natural origin and its compatibility with the action of the natural predators and parasitoids of the whitefly is an ideal tool for Integrated Pest Management (IPM), so that the insecticide’s power is combined with the biological control action.

Along the same lines, Pirecris, an insecticide based on natural pyrethrins, is made with co-formulants of botanical origin, totally natural, so it does not use Piperonil Peroxide (PBO) as synergist. Its formula is patented.

Advantages of the natural insecticides against the whiteflies on tomato plants

1.- No security deadlines

These natural insecticides do not have safety period. In fact, both Pirecris and Nakar can be applied even the day before harvesting.

 2.- Resistance management

Optimum result in resistance management strategies.

3.- Efficacy in all biological stages of insects

Although their efficacy develops over all biological stages of insects, the insects are more vulnerable to the effects of the active substance in its immature stages of development and non-flying phases.

 4.- Wetting effect

The fact that whitefly populations are placed on the underside of the leaves conditions the effectiveness of the products that act by contact, so it is advisable to use wetters.

However, Nakar has achieved a potentiating and wetting effect, so that it improves adhesion in spray applications. Moreover, it increases the adhesion of other treatments because it decreases the surface tension of the water and increases the contact surface, as well as the contact time between the pathogen and the applied active material.

 5.- Avoid molasses and bold in the crops

The whitefly secretes a species of molasses that hinders the growth of the plant because it interferes with photosynthesis and causes less vigor and, therefore, a worse quality in the fruits. This molasses favors the attack of the fungus that causes the bold in leaves, flowers and fruits, and also reduces the photosynthetic capacity of the vegetable and its respiration, depreciating the quality of the harvest, but also hindering the penetration of phytosanitary treatments.

Besides its potential as a natural insecticide, Nakar contributes to the cleaning of these molasses produced by attacks of sucking insects such as the whiteflies, in a way that avoids the fatal spread of fungi. In the same way, Nakar cleans the bold formed by the fungi.

6.- Efficiency comparable to chemicals

The different tests carried out with the bio-insecticide Nakar (SEIPASA) have shown that the efficacy of this natural insecticide equals the reference chemical in whitefly control, with the added value of not leaving residues and being suitable for integrated and ecological production.

In the last study carried out by researchers at the Technological Park of Almería (Tecnova) on integrated control of whitefly on greenhouse tomato, results confirmed the high efficiency of Nakar on immature and adult populations of this pest, cutting off their biological reproduction.

The synergy of this product with the action of Pirecris was conclusive in the control of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

If you need more information on the natural insecticides Nakar and Pirecris, please request it through the e-mail: consulta@seipasa.com.

Natural insecticides against whiteflies on Tomato Plants

If you need more information on the natural insecticides Nakar and Pirecris, please request it through the e-mail: consulta@seipasa.com.

See SEIPASA Products

Fruit Attraction 2016: New natural insecticides of SEIPASA, on the media

 

New natural insecticides of SEIPASA, on the media

 

Various media have echoed the great success obtained by the new natural insecticides of SEIPASA, Nakar and Pirecris, that were presented in the framework of Fruit Attraction 2016 and that will be a great relief for the farmer.

Why? Because producers are increasingly seeking more effective tools to finish with the pests without creating resistance and without leaving residues in crops, which results in greater acceptance and value in international markets; SEIPASA is the solution.

Here are some of the online media that have excelled in their pages the good reception of the new natural products of SEIPASA:

http://www.hortoinfo.es/index.php/noticia/7326-seip-f-att-071016
http://www.lasprovincias.es/ribera-costera/201610/08/seipasa-presenta-madrid-novedosos-20161008004727-v.html
http://heconomia.es/volatil.asp?o=-1628923942&c=agro
http://www.foodnewslatam.com/6188-las-nuevas-armas-naturales-contra-las-plagas-seipasa-fruit-attraction.html
http://www.interempresas.net/Horticola/Articulos/162938-Seipasa-presento-sus-nuevas-‘armas’-naturales-contra-las-plagas.html
http://www.phytoma.com/noticias/empresas/9951-las-nuevas-armas-naturales-de-seipasa-contra-las-plagas-la-revelacion-de-fruit-attraction-2016
http://www.fhalmeria.com/detallenoticia.aspx?id=t%2BpVvn%2FWMOgL6X%2FWeKTiXg%3D%3D
http://www.infoagro.com/noticias/2016/insecticidas_naturales_de_seipasa__revelacion_en_fruit_attraction.asp
http://www.inocuidadlatam.com/index.php/3480-las-nuevas-%E2%80%98armas%E2%80%99-naturales-contra-las-plagas.html
http://www.ifema.es/Institucional_01/noticias/INS_P_554797

SEIPASA in Fruit Attraction 2016

SEIPASA at Fruit Attraction 2016

SEIPASA images at Fruit Attraction 2016

Successful participation and great reception of ‘Zero Residues’ SEIPASA products

Click on the thumbnails to see the photos to superior size

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The passage of SEIPASA along Fruit Attraction 2016 has concluded exceeding expectations. With large numbers of visitors throughout the whole fair, which was held from 5 to 7 October at the IFEMA fairgrounds, SEIPASA says goodbye satisfied by the great success of their products and new developments.

The new natural insecticides of SEIPASA Nakar and Pirecris have aroused great interest among professionals in the sector, given its high capacity to control pests – demonstrated with diverse independent tests – with the added value, with regard to the conventional products, of obtaining ‘Zero Residues‘ crops.

 

This was evidenced by the success of call in the technical talk devoted to explaining the properties, field efficiencies and integration strategies IPM (Integrated Pest Management) of new insecticides solutions Nakar and Pirecris by SEIPASA technical director, Javier Nácher.

During the event many attendees were interested in the SEIPASA latest developments.

The future of the agricultural sector was also present at the SEIPASA’s stand represented by a group of students from the Polytechnic University of Madrid. The director of R&D+i department, Francisco Espinosa, responded to their concerns and showed them the great potential that natural treatments  can reach, most of them of botanical origin, after a thorough research and development to achieve the ideal formulation.

SEIPASA’s stand was also the scene of a meeting of all partners making up the consortium responsible for carrying out the ambitious European project Life+ Zero Residues (LIFE12 ENV/ES/000902: LIFE Zero Residues: towards a sustainable production and supply chain for stone fruit). The conclusions of this initiative, aimed at improving the quality and sustainability of production, conservation and marketing of stone fruit with the guarantee to be free of residues, speak of success.

For more information about SEIPASA products (biopesticides, biostimulants, fertilizers…), contact us: consulta@seipasa.com

Ubicación Seipasa en Fruit Attraction 2016

SEIPASA in Fruit Attraction: New natural pesticides

The latest and Innovative Residue Zero solutions for present and future needs in a crop protection market increasingly limited will be displayed in Fruit Attraction 2016, Pavilion 4 stand 4G07

Technical director will reveal the extraordinary potential of ‘New natural insecticides’ in the Innova Forum 7, Thursday 6 at 11:30 a.m.

Book an appointment to be advised personally in the stand of SEIPASA to know nearly the advances in control biostimulation and fertilization http://www.seipasa.com/fruit-attraction/

SEIPASA has been nominated for ‘Estrellas de Internet’ Prizes, organized by Fruit Today, in the category of Best Blog

Seipasa en Fruit Attraction 2015

Seipasa en Fruit Attraction 2015

New and specialized natural broad-spectrum insecticides (Nakar and Pirecris), the best chance to hold off Lepidoptera (Bt32 Seipasa) and the ideal tool to including in control programs of fungal diseases (Septum) are some of the latest technologically advanced natural pesticides emerged from Seipasa Technology that will be present at Fruit Attraction 2016 (Pavilion 4 stand 4G07).

In a context in which it becomes increasingly difficult to find solutions to tackle pests and diseases due to the strict regulation in plant health and active substances, SEIPASA responds to the current needs of the crop protection market and anticipates the future, always with the guarantee of obtaining free residues crops.

Phytosanitary developments

It is in this spirit that SEIPASA will also disclose in this important industry event its latest phytosanitary developments ‘Zero Residues‘.

These include those aimed at controlling thrips in horticultural, Taphrina deformans in fruit trees or powdery mildew and downy mildew, among other foliar fungi.

SEIPASA not only provides specialized solutions for major cultures but also for minor cultures which, with the new situation, are more affected if possible by the lack of treatments. Aphids, whiteflies, mites, woodlice, mildews, dappled… For each problem, a solution.

‘New natural insecticides’

Technical director of the company, Javier Nácher, will reveal in Innova Forum the extraordinary potential of the New natural insecticides of SEIPASA, their properties, field efficiencies and fusion strategies Integrated Pest Management. They are pesticides, totally natural, that will mark a before and after in the fight against certain pests and diseases.

The talk will take place on Thursday, 6 at 11:30 am at the core connecting 7-9 (Innova Forum 7).

In addition, SEIPASA’s Blog (http://blog.seipasa.com/en/) has been selected as one of the finalists in the ‘Estrellas de Internet’ Prizes, organized by Fruit Today. Winner will be announced on the 6th, at 17.30 hours, in Proexport stand (4A01c).

Biostimulants

The latest generation of SEIPASA’s biostimulants cannot be absent to this important appointment. They represent a key tool to maximize returns on production costs. Without having a direct effect on pathogens, they allow invigorating and induce resistance in plants. In this way, they can prevent the attack from many pests and diseases.

Kynetic4, one of the most complete biostimulants; Seisil, potassium and soluble silicon source; Seiland, an excellent product to stimulate the development of roots and absorption of nutrients; and Sweetsei, the best solution to contribute to the increase of sugars, maturation and fattening of the fruit, are some of the major biostimulants of Seipasa.

Personal advice. Book an appointment

To know these last generation innovations and solutions, you can visit the stand of SEIPASA in Fruit Attraction 2016 (Pavilion 4 stand 4G07). You can even book an appointment in advance to receive a personal advice:  http://www.seipasa.com/fruit-attraction/. We will be waiting for you.

Seipasa location in Fruit Attraction 2016

Seipasa location in Fruit Attraction 2016

Seipasa location in Fruit Attraction 2016

Cochinilla en plátano

New classification for dangerous pests, priority and quarantine pests

Priority pests will be tied to stricter rules; more EU Member States may receive funding to eliminate them

One more step, the second to last already, towards the entry into force of new rules on protective measures against plant pests. The EU Council has approved the new regulations and the only measure left is the green light by European Parliament. Its entry into force is planned for early 2017 and may be applied in three years from that date.

According to the new law on plant health, which will replace the current Directive (2000/29 / EC), the most dangerous pests (quarantine) will be better defined and divided into “priority epidemics” and “other quarantine pests”.

This  way, priority pests “will be subject to stricter eradication and public information rules while more Member States will be able to receive greater financial support from Brussels to eliminate them”, said the European Council in a statemente.

The plant health passport

Pests. Aphid on pear

Among the measures intended to boost supervision and promote early eradication of pests is the extension, simplification and harmonization of the plant health passport, mandatory for the circulation of plants among professional traders within the EU

Likewise, the text will require professional traders to register in order to ensure simpler controls and a better traceability of plant circulation.

The new regulation will also contain measures to deal with pests introduced from non-EU countries, according to an approach based on the risk level.

Imported materials, risk level

Thus, in order to quickly identify pest risk probability and other plant health risks, a system for the prior assessment of plants and materials from third countries will be introduced. Once identified, temporary bans will be imposed to those plants involving risk, intended to prevent the introduction of pests in the European Union territory.

Professional traders dedicated to import of plants and vegetable products will need a phytosanitary certificate, just as will clients of postal and Internet services and passengers importing plants susceptible to pest risks. However, individual travelers importing small quantities of plants for private use would be exempt.

When a diseased plant is identified, it will be included in a list of high risk plants, and therefore will not be able to obtain the European certificate.

The stance of the EU Council confirms the agreement reached with the European Parliament in December 2015, also approved by the Twenty-eight permanent ambassadors last May. Only remains pending the approval by the European Parliament at second reading.

See the full document on the proposed Regulation of protection measures against plant pests here.

 

Fuentes:

http://www.consilium.europa.eu/es/press/press-releases/2016/07/18-tackling-plant-pests-new-measures-adopted/

http://video.consilium.europa.eu/en/webcast/dbe88c55-a301-455f-b24c-cbcb015f5f63

 

Olivar en Jaén

Quality and quantity, the goals to reach growing olive groves

Profitability, both in the short and long term, is determined by the balance given by natural products specialized in vegetative growth and pest control

Quantity and quality in the olive production are not conflicting parameters. Advances in natural technology for agriculture by companies with a major background in the R&D field just like SEIPASA have led to specialized products available to the farmer that imply a boost to the health and vigor of plants – either by activating their metabolism or by protecting them from pests and diseases that curb and hurt them- and result both in the harvest’s weight and final quality.

They are completely natural inputs that not only offer more energy to the plant, but also maintain the natural balance of the agricultural ecosystem, regenerating and revitalizing the environment. Thus, present profitability is improved while tuning the crop while, and perhaps this is more important, future profitability is also improved thanks to the favorable conditions in which the olive trees and land is left.

What are these natural tools?

Starting with the rhizosphere, olive trees need a base that promotes the activity of beneficial soil microorganisms, boosting a barrier against pathogens at the same time it stimulates root development. These benefits can be obtained with reference products such as Seiland, a root protector that strengthens the plant’s defense system and promotes the generation of lateral roots and root hairs, and nutrient assimilation.

Without neglecting the importance of balanced irrigation and fertilization, there are crucial stages in the olive tree production cycle that require special care if qualitative and quantitative targets want to be achieved. Especially on sprouting, flowering and fruit setting. They are moments of high energy demand; times when the action of Kynetic4 becomes pillar to ensure success.

Its bio-stimulating effect not only favors a good development of all these processes, which will brand the year’s harvest and part of the next’s, but also prepares olive trees to cope with immunity with abiotic stress such as frost. It should be kept in mind that olive tree buds, unlike almost all woody plants, are not protected by scales and hence are more sensitive to cold.

Nutrition and flowering in olive groves

Olive inflorescence occurs over last year’s buds, and rarely on the new ones. It depends on what the tree has experienced over the previous year in terms of water supply in the soil, nutrients or temperature, but this can also be boosted by the enhancing effects of Kynetic4..

This next-generation bio-stimulant also has an important role in the fruit setting process, since it increases pollen germination and thus optimizes the setting.

Fighting pests and diseases naturally

Olive mountain

Achieving optimal production parameters also means knowing how to fight pests and diseases while maintaining crop health intact. In this sense, it is vital to follow guidelines of integrated pest control, maximizing natural resources for biodiversity, the environment and your own future profitability.

That is why is necessary to maintain and enhance the pests’ natural enemies jointly with other physical and cultural methods and, especially, with the use of natural treatments compatible with biological control. SEIPASA constant research in this area has led to obtain clever formulations that are highly effective against insect pests and other harmful agents.

That’s the case with Pirecris, which features a quick action on different types of populations, including olive fly, olive moth (prays) and glifodes. These are three of the pests that most damage are inflicting over olive groves in Jaén, that require effective fighting tools, capable of avoiding resistance and sensitivity in olive trees.

Pirecris’ natural effectiveness not only answers to the pyrethrum extract’s active ingredient: its activity is enhanced by the botanical-based, green co-formulants, unlike many pyrethrin-based based references that include synthetic compounds. This is a unique, perfectly balanced combination which not only protects olive trees from pest attacks, but also guarantees the protection of this crop.

Producers can also use natural formulations alternative to copper such as Glucosei, which implies a great support to prevent fungi proliferation.

In short, optimal management of olive crops derives from the application of biological, cultural and biotechnical measures, backed with specialized treatments that are as effective as respectful of the agricultural system that receives and animates them. It is a path open to long-term profitability.

Inspección equipos de aplicación de fitosanitarios

Inspection of gear for plant health products application

Where are they performed? What kind of equipment must pass the inspection? What elements are inspected? How often should they be inspected? All about inspections:

All equipment for the application of plant health products should be inspected at least once before November 26th, 2016, according to Royal Decree 1702/2011, which sets no postponements. This means that, effective that date, equipment that have not been inspected shall not be used.

Inspection frequency

From that point on, frequency of inspections, as indicated by Spain’s Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment, should be as follows:

  • New gear: In the first five years after purchase
  • Further inspections: Every five years, except for certain holders that will have triennial inspections
  • From 2020: Every three years

Inspection fulfillment

Farmers can freely chose the season to perform the inspection, while the holder may be present during the procedure. If the inspection results are adverse, for example, a serious flaw is found, the equipment cannot be used until defective items are repaired.

Inspections are carried out in accordance with the Inspections Manual issued by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment: http://www.magrama.gob.es/es/agricultura/publicaciones/Manual_de_inspección_de_equipos_de_aplicación_de_fitosanitario1_tcm7-191068.pdf

Elements to be inspected

The elements of the equipment for the application of health plant products to be inspected are:

  • Power transmission elements
  • Pump
  • Agitation
  • Spray liquid tank
  • Measuring and regulation and control systems
  • Pipes and hoses
  • Filtering
  • Spray bars, in equipment that include them
  • Nozzles
  • Distribution
  • Pneumatic system, in equipment that include them

Measurements

  1. Pressure gauge
  2. Pressure regulation
  3. Nozzles flow

Types of equipment that must pass inspection

1.- Mobile equipment engaged in agricultural activities

  • Hydraulic sprayers (bars or pistols)
  • Hydropneumatic sprayers (atomizers)
  • Pneumatic (nebulizers) and centrifugal sprayers
  • Shakers

2.- Stationary and fixed equpment inp remises and greenhouses
3.- Application equpment for aerial treatment
4.- Mobile teams dedicted to other non-agricultural use

This kind of equipment must be pre-registered in the Official Register of Agricultural Machinery (ROMA)

os equipos deben estar previamente inscritos en el Registro Oficial de Maquinaria Agrícola (ROMA)

Where inspections are carried out

Technical inspection stations for plant health products application equipment (ITEAF) are authorized, entitled and controlled by each autonomous community government in Spain. ITEAF must have mobile units and inspections may be carried out on these or in fixed station facilities.

ITEAF authorized by Region: : http://www.magrama.gob.es/es/agricultura/temas/medios-de-produccion/iteafautorizadas20abril2016versionparapublicarenlaweb28-04-2016_tcm7-419656.pdf

Regulation context

The proper application of pesticides requires a homogeneous distribution of the product, and that it complies with the approved and recommended doses, in order to avoid adverse harmful effects on human health and the environment. Poor settings in application equipment or machines can lead to irregular distributions and defects, failures or misalignments can cause product leaks or spills in inappropriate places.

The December 20th, 43/2002 Law on plant health, seeks to guarantee that plant health means gather all the necessary conditions and lays down the basic provisions on the requirements these means must comply with, its rational use attending, regarding to application equipment, both the use conditions of the pesticide applied in each case and the maintenance and tuning requirements of such equipment, official controls to verify compliance with those provisions and support tools necessary for conducting corresponding inspections.

Meanwhile, the October 21st Directive 2009/128/EC of the European Parliament and Council that establishes the Sustainable Use of Pesticides lays down certain mandatory requirements in this area. Article 8 and Annex II establish that application equipment for plant health products must work properly, ensuring product distribution accuracy and dosing, as well as the absence of leaks in filling, emptying and maintenance operations.

In order to implement and develop the regulations mentioned above, Spain’s Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment published November 18th Royal Decree 1702/2011 on mandatory inspections of equipment for the application of plant health products. Thus are established official controls for the verification of compliance with the requirements for maintenance and tuning of this equipment, the basic regulation for inspection, and the necessary rules of coordination with the autonomous communities’ governments, with an authorization regime for stations that perform the technical inspections.

Source: Spain’s Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment

(http://www.magrama.gob.es/es/agricultura/temas/medios-de-produccion/maquinaria-agricola/inspecciones-equipos-aplicacion-productos-fitosanitarios/#para3)

(http://www.magrama.gob.es/es/agricultura/temas/medios-de-produccion/DIPTICO_ITEAF_tcm7-368267.pdf)

Sandía virus venas amarillas

Cucumber vein yellowing virus CVYV

This disease, transmitted by the white fly, Bemisia Tabaci, affects cucurbitaceae such as the cucumber, courgette, melon or watermelon

The disease known as “Cucumber vein yellowing virus” (CVYV) is transmitted through the adult individuals of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) and affects cucurbitaceae species such as the cucumber, courgette, melon or water melon.

It was located for the first time in 1960 in cucurbitaceae cultivated in Israel. It appears to be related to the sweet potato mild mottle virus (SPMMV). It is wide-spread in Western Mediterranean countries, and since 2001 it affects the fields of Andalusia.

Symptoms of the vein yellowing virus

In cucumber and melos:
Yellowing of the veins is observed in the leaves of the shoot, a characteristic whence the virus derives its name, although, depending on the moment of infection, this yellowing can also occur in a generalised manner in the entire plant.  The plant development is also less.

In cucumber fruit, a light green, dark green, mosaic occurs, whilst no symptoms occur in melon fruit.

Virus venas amarillas en sandíaIt seems that this virus, associated with the cucurbit yellow stunting disorder  virus (CYSDV), produces a synergism that boosts the symptoms of both virus

In courgette:
The symptoms observed on the leaves are a slight yellowing of the veins.

In watermelon: In leaves where it has been detected, the chlorosis symptoms are very mild and may go unnoticed. At times, they are even symptom-free. A strong internal necrosis has been observed in the fruit, as well as splitting of this fruit, which is attributed to the virus, although whether this is a unique and/or direct consequence has not been entirely demonstrated.

Transmission of the vein yellowing disease

The virus is transmitted by the vector insect, Bemisia Tabaci (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). The adults of this whitefly can be observed on the backs of the leaves like small insects that measure somewhat more than 1 millimetre long with a yellowish body and white wings due to the secretion of waxes that covers them.

A virus acquisition period of at least 30 minutes is needed, and at least 15 minutes feeding on the plant is required to inoculate it. The insect retains the virus for 6 hours and has a latent period of 75 minutes. Low transmission effectiveness by the Bemisia Tabaci has been indicated, and at least 15 to 20 insects are required per plant for its transmission.

Methods to combat Bemisia Tabaci

The management methods are based mainly on controlling the Bemisia Tabaci vector by means of prevention and culture practices (use of meshes, elimination of plant waste, use of resistant varieties, use of certified virus-free material, …), as well as plant health and integrated management practices.

The Regional Ministry of Agriculture and Fishery of the Junta of Andalusia, advises a series of specific measures:

  • Placement of double mesh on the edges and ridges of the greenhouses and placement of double door or mesh at the entrance.
  • When the climate conditions (especially humidity) permit adequate ventilation of the greenhouse, placement of anti-trip meshes.
  • Use of yellow chromotropic traps.
  • Surveillance and control of the white fly in early cultivation stages and seed beds.
  • Set up the measures relating to cleaning plant remains and weeds in the greenhouse and surrounding areas. Pull out and immediately eliminate plants affected by the virus during cultivation.
  • Not abandoning the crops and carrying out treatment against Bemisia Tabaci before pulling them out is compulsory as a management method, as well as correctly eliminating the plant remains.
  • Leave a rest period of at least one month between one cucurbitaceae crop and the next one to break the cycle of whitefly.

To control the whitefly in the framework of the integrated management of pests, natural specialised plant health products that have proved to be very effective in eradicating Bemisia Tabaci can be resorted to, as is the case of Pirecris.

Source: Consejería de Agricultura y Pesca. Andalucía.
                 fitodiagnostico.com

Curva degradación residuos cero

How to achieve zero residues crops in conventional agriculture

Towards Zero Residues in traditional agriculture

Any conventional agricultural production -thus not restricted to organic agriculture- can get fruit, vegetables and grains free of chemical residues, Zero Residues. How? We will explain.

To be clear about this process, we should talk about the so-called degradation curves or waste disposal curves. Which are the graphical representation of the evolution over time of residues present in plants treated with pesticides.

The application of pesticides generates a deposit (amount of the substance that remains in the plant immediately after treatment), which depends on the product used, its formulation, the presence of adjuvants, of the application, the vegetable’s morphology, of the weight-surface ratio of and of weather conditions at the time of application.

Since the initial deposit, occurs a progressive degradation of the pesticide by mechanical, physical and chemical agents, derived from climatic factors (temperature, wind, rain, humidity, sunshine) and the nature of the plant and the pesticide.

This process may be foreseen according to models that set the rate of heat loss, setting curves that let us learn theoretical concentrations for a particular application time.

teoretica curveThat is why curves of authorized pesticides for each crop allow us to know how the residues content changes over time in the fruit and, thus, determines the “safety periods” (minimum period of time that must elapse between treatment and harvesting the product, or the entry of cattle in the treated plot).

Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs)

The danger of a residue is determined by the toxicity of its active material, the characteristics of the formulation, the potential metabolites generated by the degradation process itself, its bioaccumulation, the amount of residues in the collection or consumption, and the degree of exposition.

In order to protect public health against the toxicity of chemical residues in agricultural products, they are regulated by the Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) rules.

This is the maximum amount of chemical residues that plant products may contain when they reach the market; that is, the allowed concentration acceptable for long term human or  animal consumption.

In conventional agriculture, following the best practices implies crops that do not exceed those Maximum Residue Limits if the legally established criteria (dose, timing, adjustment of product-cultivation…) is respected.

Residues degradation to zero

Degradation curve phytosanitariesThe curve process is as follows: There is a brief latency period, after which a progressive decrease in the residues concentration (dissipation area) is reported. This comes to a point where degradation occurs more slowly (persistence zone) until reaching the harvest period, in which the parameters of the Maximum Residue Limits (MRLs) must be met.

Also, it must be kept in mind that in many cases several applications of a pesticide are necessary at different times of the production cycle, which causes the degradation curve to move to the right. This way, the closer the harvesting time, the more residues will reach the final production.

But, in addition to this method, the practice leads to focus on another highly effective and even more natural formulation: planning each crop following the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategy with the added goal of a ‘zero residues’ crop.

Thus, it is established as the main performance in pest control prioritization mechanisms of natural regulation as the use of biological control and the use of plant protection products compatible with biological control organisms (OCB) are like SEIPASA biopesticides, of so that free crop residues is guaranteed from the beginning.

Degradation curve, Zero Residues

SEIPASA biopesticides degradation curve, highly specialized in removing different pests, has dissipative and persistence periods with more convergence towards zero, which guarantees a residues-free harvest.

This ensures fruits, vegetables and cereals without toxic remains reach the population tables, not even legally permitted levels.

Value-added harvest

All of this adds value to the agricultural product, both in quality (nutritional, sensory and visual) and nutritional health, which more and more consumers ask for, along with large retail chains. Moreover, major retail outlets are no longer satisfied only with respect to Maximum Residue Limits, they ask for much lower levels.

The great effectiveness of SEIPASA biopesticides can keep pests at bay while protecting the crop in a more natural, sustainable and healthy way, but also avoids the harmful effects caused by chemical pesticides such as some plants’ sensitivity to pests or diseases or some pests’ resistance to pesticides, which make them not only useless but also contaminants.

It must be kept in mind, as discussed before, that synthetic products can be replaced entirely by SEIPASA’s natural treatments from the cycle start, achieving the same effectiveness. SEIPASA biopesticides are a major element in Integrated Pest Management (IPM).

For more information on the most appropriate biopesticide for each crop and production cycle, and o application times in order to achieve a ‘zero residues’ harvest:  consulta@seipasa.com